The Canticum Novum Singers

"An elite chorus.." — The New York Times

Recent Reviews

January 2016
"Ok, just close your eyes and let the music transport you. Maybe you’re in Old St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, or St. Stephen’s in Vienna; perhaps it’s Reims Cathedral in France. Well, good news: You don’t have to travel to far-flung European destinations to hear melodious, medieval voices because right here in New York one can feel the ambience of these splendid edifices as the glorious sounds of the Canticum Novum Singers envelope you." - Barbara Barton Sloane, Examiner.com

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April 29, 2014
“ . . . Harold Rosenbaum's New York Canticum Novum Singers gave a performance of Johann Sebastian Bach's monumental St. Matthew Passion that was wonderful . . .”
Jean Ballard Terepka, Theater Scene

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December 16, 2012
As expected, the (Canticum Novum Singers), 41 strong, acquitted itself admirably.
James R. Oestreich, The New York Times
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June 1, 2012
The May 19 Canticum Novum Singers' performance of Johann Sebastian Bach's Mass in B Minor embodied elegance, authority and multifaceted beauty. Harold Rosenbaum's insightful, clear direction elicited subtly colored performances from the singers and The Artemis Chamber Ensemble alike. The evening was moving and thrilling.

Rosenbaum has read Bach's B Minor Mass as an intensely personal work, not simply an abstract rendition of liturgical text. The fact that the work is so familiar to most audiences of sacred choral music did not diminish the unusually rich sense of welcome and inclusion of Rosenbaum's reading: the May 19 performance rendered the music exciting for even a first-time listener.

The artistic generosity of the Canticum Novum Singers' B Minor Mass unfolded in part from the performance's sureness and precision of technical expression. singers' and orchestra's overall technical competence – and even happy bravura – made the performance inclusive, never aloof. Harold Rosenbaum's direction of singers and instrumentalists made Bach's B Minor Mass a living paradigm of witness and faith. It was an inspiring evening.
— Jean Ballard Terepka, Theatrescene.net
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May 22, 2012
Harold Rosenbaum …. directed his Canticum Novum Singers in the B minor Mass on Saturday evening…. He simply led his 53 singers, 4 soloists and the moderately scaled Artemis Chamber Ensemble in a generally brisk, shapely performance that focused on the work’s devotional core and celebrated its extraordinary structure….Mr. Rosenbaum and company produced a powerful sound and a reading with sufficient sweep… The chorus was well blended and sang with an ear for color. The soloists…. were well matched in the duets, and consistently moving in their solo contributions. The orchestral playing was distinguished too.
— Allan Kozinn, The New York Times
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December 23, 2011
The participants in “Pilgrimage” showed up on Wednesday night outside the Metropolitan Museum of Art all set for a bracing walk and clearly eager to sing. The idea behind this event, directed by the choral conductor Harold Rosenbaum, was to walk north from the museum, across Central Park, then west on 110th Street to the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, all the way singing medieval melodies once sung by pilgrims headed to Santiago de Compostela in Spain on a route that covered hundreds of miles.

For this abbreviated Manhattan pilgrimage, there were, from my estimation, at least 150 people, only a handful of them from the Canticum Novum Singers, an early-music choir directed by Mr. Rosenbaum, who arrived dressed as a monk and playfully calling himself Brother Harold of Williamsburg. Copies of the sheet music for the medieval melodies were passed out and Mr. Rosenbaum led the pilgrims in a brief rehearsal on the steps of the museum, relying on a small megaphone to be heard, though he was mostly hapless at using it. “Sorry,” he said, “but this is the ninth century.”

When the pilgrims reached the cathedral after about a 90-minute procession, they gathered near the altar where Mr. Rosenbaum led final renditions of the medieval melodies, which, after all the practice, sounded quite good.
— Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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May 6, 2011
Harold Rosenbaum's acclaimed chorus...
— The New Yorker